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New mortgage rules are mixed blessing for borrowers
http://america.aljazeera.com/articles/2014/1/10/new-mortgage-rulescreatemixedblessingforborrowers.html
New mortgage rules are mixed blessing for borrowers One of the chief elements of the Dodd-Frank Act, passed in 2010 to bring greater regulation to the banking industry, the new rules require lenders to verify that borrowers have good credit and will be able to maintain payments. . But those changes

Time to Quit Mortgage Banking?
http://www.americanbanker.com/bankthink/time-to-quit-mortgage-banking-1064881-1.html
Interest Rate Risk: Mortgage rates have been dropping for 30 years, and it's a good bet that they've already hit their bottom with only one direction to go. Mortgage banking operators always claim to be fully hedged, but sudden spikes in interest rates

The Tale of a House, and an Entire Market
http://www.nytimes.com/2014/01/26/business/the-tale-of-a-house-and-an-entire-market.html?hpw&rref=business
One of them, at 12204 Backus Drive in Bowie, Md., was a four-bedroom colonial with a bay window. The average home price that year was $150,000; this house, in a desirable middle-class suburb of . They are joined in that belief by a vast majority of

Canadian versus US mortgages
http://www.winnipegfreepress.com/opinion/analysis/Canadian-versus-US-mortgages-241871271.html
They'd love to be rid of the borrower-friendly 30-year fixed mortgage, but also rid of regulations that would prevent them from piling on to borrowers in so many other ways. They don't want an improved system in the U.S., just one that's better for

Lewis Black on Broadway talking about how America ISN'T #1

This is the truest thing Lewis Black has ever said.... which is why it's so damn funny.

Strong spring real estate season shaping up — but who’s got the advantage?

Buyers, strongly favoring neither?

Maybe. Based on the latest national consumer-sentiment survey by mortgage investor Fannie Mae, American consumers appear to think so. They’re more positive about the overall direction of the housing market than they’ve been in nearly a year. Growing numbers think it’s a good time to sell and a good time to buy. They expect their own personal financial situations will improve this year, and they believe that interest rates for home loans will continue to remain relatively affordable.

Housing and mortgage economists tend to agree. As Michael Fratantoni, chief economist of the Mortgage Bankers Association, told me: Six months ago, “I was guardedly optimistic. Now I’m just plain optimistic.” Mark Fleming, chief economist of First American Title Insurance, says: “So far in 2019, we’ve seen mortgage rates decline and wages rise — both trends work to boost home-buying power and fuel greater market potential for home sales, setting the stage for a stronger than expected” season.

Mortgage rates today, April 12, 2019, plus lock recommendations | Mortgage Rates, Mortgage News and Strategy

Comes with some risk

Of course, it’s possible the Federal Reserve’s last big statement on rates has established a long-term downward trend. That might be behind Freddie’s statement yesterday. But you can still expect to see rises (such as those last week) and falls within it as other risk factors emerge and recede. And, depending on how near you are to your closing date, you may not have time to ride out any increases.

We are today dropping the “Brexit threat” section below. On Wednesday, the UK and European Union agreed on a new exit date of, appropriately enough, Halloween. So, with luck, we can all take a breather from that unsightly mess.

Risks from an inverted bond yield curve and a future recession

You may have read about the recent (though no longer current) inversion of the bond yield curve. And you may understandably have chosen to skip over that bit. But the jargon hides a simple phenomenon: Yields on short-term U.S. Treasury bonds were higher than those for long-term ones. And that’s highly unusual. Normally, you get a higher return the longer you’re locked into an investment.

My daughter worked for a division of American Mortgage called ABC Direct. She lost her job when American went?

bankrupt in Aug. '07 and is unable to find a W2 form from them. After contacting a former admin person, she was given a payroll site to get her info from, but they require a password that no one seems to know.


sometimes those sites are set up with the date of birth or employee id # as the password.