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Obama, Congress focus on unemployment benefits
http://www.saukvalley.com/2014/01/07/obama-congress-focus-on-unemployment-benefits/al2ljbm/
Obama, Congress focus on unemployment benefits Katherine Hackett, an unemployed Connecticut woman who introduced Obama, called the benefits “absolutely essential” to covering her necessities, such as her mortgage and health care, as she looked for work. She said she's cut expenses and “is not just 

Mel Watt becomes new chief overseeing Fannie, Freddie
http://www.charlotteobserver.com/2014/01/06/4592079/mel-watt-becomes-new-chief-overseeing.html
Eulada Watt looks on in the Eisenhower Executive Office Building of the White House, January 6, 2014 in Washington, DC. (Olivier Douliery/Abaca Press/MCT) Watt, 68, said in a statement he was “honored” to lead the little known, but very

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Top charities give larger portion to services than Wounded Warrior Project

WASHINGTON – What is an extra $75 million to help wounded troops and veterans?

That is how much more money the Wounded Warrior Project could have spent on direct aid in 2014, if it managed its donations like other top-rated military charities.

But as others strived to spend most of every dollar on people in need, the nonprofit group instead pumped one-third of its donations into more fundraising. It had grown into a charity colossus that collected $312 million in donations and modeled itself on Starbucks, CEO Steven Nardizzi told the New York Times this week.

The approach turned Wounded Warrior Project into the largest charity of its type – eclipsing others and drawing allegations this week of lavish spending on conferences and meetings. It has meant bucking the frugal grassroots ethic of more traditional charities, which tend to be more low-key and reliant on community generosity.

“The donors’ money, they want it to go to the mission of Homes for Our Troops. So, if they give us $10, they want to know most of it is going to build that home,” said retired Army Gen. Richard Cody, chairman of the board for the charity, which builds specially equipped homes for veterans across the United States.