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Obama, Congress focus on unemployment benefits
Obama, Congress focus on unemployment benefits Katherine Hackett, an unemployed Connecticut woman who introduced Obama, called the benefits “absolutely essential” to covering her necessities, such as her mortgage and health care, as she looked for work. She said she's cut expenses and “is not just 

Mel Watt becomes new chief overseeing Fannie, Freddie
Eulada Watt looks on in the Eisenhower Executive Office Building of the White House, January 6, 2014 in Washington, DC. (Olivier Douliery/Abaca Press/MCT) Watt, 68, said in a statement he was “honored” to lead the little known, but very

Mortgage Interest Rates

Understanding how mortgage interest rates are quoted

Trump plan: Less health insurance for lower premiums

The Trump administration spelled out a plan on Tuesday to lower the cost of health insurance: give consumers the option of buying less coverage in exchange for reduced premiums.

The proposed regulations would expand an alternative to the comprehensive medical plans required under former President Barack Obama’s health law. Individuals could buy so-called “short-term” policies for up to 12 months. But the coverage would omit key consumer protections and offer fewer benefits, making it unattractive for people with health problems.

The plans would come with a disclaimer that they don’t meet the Affordable Care Act’s safeguards, such as guaranteed coverage, ten broad classes of benefits, and dollar limits on coverage. Insurers could charge more if a consumer’s medical history discloses health problems.

Nonetheless, administration officials said they believe the short-term option will be welcomed by people who need an individual health insurance policy but don’t qualify for the ACA’s income-based subsidies.

Trump lauded delivery of 'F-52s' to Norway, but they only exist in 'Call of Duty'

President Donald Trump's announcement of U.S-made F-52s fighter aircraft delivered to Norway may have rattled its neighbor Russia, the source of rising tension among NATO allies. Was it a secret advanced jet capable of beating its Russian counterparts? A ruse to fool intelligence analysts?

Neither, it turns out. The F-52 is a fictional jet only available to fly if you're a gamer at the controls of "Call of Duty: Advanced Warfare."

Trump lauded the sale of the fictional planes alongside Norwegian Prime Minister Erna Solberg at the White House on Wednesday, remarking on the very real and growing defense relationship with the U.S.'s northern Europe ally.

"In November we started delivering the first F-52s and F-35 fighter jets," Trump said. "We have a total of 52, and they've delivered a number of them already a little ahead of schedule."

Trump was reading from a statement, and it appears he combined the figure of 52 planes with the "F" designation assigned to fighter jets in the U.S. inventory, like the F-35 Lightning II. Lockheed Martin, the defense company that produces the aircraft, said on its website that Norway requested a total of 52, with funding set aside by the country to purchase 22 so far, the site says. A trio of F-35s arrived in Norway in November, Reuters reported.